Hector to be guest presenter at a workshop on social media marketing strategies

I will be a guest presenter at a social media workshop on April 7 in Denver. If you are struggling to figure out how to integrate social media into your marketing tool-kit or could benefit on a technology primer on security and data ownership issues, this workshp might be of interest to you. This workshop will provide you with actionable strategies and tactics in support of attaining your marketing goals and will not waste your time with basic tutorials on social media basics such as setting up a Twitter account.

Details

  • Title: “Social Media Strategies for Your Business Brand – A Marketing and Technology Primer”
  • Date: April 7
  • Time: 8:00 am – 12:00 noon
  • Place: Denver Athletic Club
  • Cost: $295 (includes light breakfast, and 12 page comprehensive resource guide). Group rates available.
  • On-line registration: http://www.idiaz.org/Workshop/

Topics include:

  • How to decide which social media tools can grow your business
  • Blogging to meet your business goals
  • Optimizing social media for search engines so you are found by qualified customers
  • How social media can provide market research, generate leads, and create customer advocates of your brand
  • Time management and social media. How much, how long?
  • Where is my data? Who can see my data? – Privacy
  • Who owns my data? – Terms of use
  • Is my data safe? Who can read my e-mail? – Security/Privacy
  • Is e-commerce safe? – Security/Authentication
  • Banking and on-line purchases, accepting payments on-line

For more information on the event: www.idiaz.org/Workshop .

The workshop will be led by Lisa Diaz of iDiaz Marketing. Lisa is a Denver based social media marketing expert. Lisa has over 20 years of experience developing strategic marketing communications, direct marketing, and branding solutions for small, medium, and Fortune 500 size companies. She started iDiaz Marketing in 2009 as a marketing training company designed to help small businesses grow with the knowledge to develop cost-effective, marketing programs.

Please share this announcement with anyone you think might benefit from attending this workshop.

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Using VeriSign Digital ID Class 1 Certificates on a Mac

Back in October I recommended getting a free personal e-mail certificate from Thawte for e-mail security. Thawte stopped offering Personal Email Certificates on November 16, 2009. I decided to take up Thawte on their offer of a free one-year VeriSign Email Certificate (Digital ID Class 1). Here are some things I learned — the hard way about using a VeriSign Digital ID Class 1 on the Mac environment.
I followed the instructions on the e-mail from Thawte and downloaded my certificate from Verisign using Safari. It got loaded to my keychain and I thought I life was good. The Mail application could not find the new certificate associated with the my e-mail address.
Here is what I found out: Modern browsers have crypto tools which generate public/private key-pairs. When signing up for a certificate with an authority (as with VeriSign), their website should trigger your browser to create a key-pair and then upload the public key, which is then certified and returned to you. This certificate is in a file format called .p12.
Using Safari, the certificate I got from VeriSign was a .p7c file, which has no copy of your private key.
The only way I was able to get a proper .p12 file was using Firefox on my Mac to access the VeriSign certificate tools to renew my certificate (which essentially revokes the old one and generates a new one).
Once the certificate was installed in Firefox, I exported it to a .p12 file which I then imported into my keychain after deleting the useless certificate that had been previously imported.
Problem solved.

Back in October I recommended getting a free personal e-mail certificate from Thawte for e-mail security. Thawte stopped offering Personal Email Certificates on November 16, 2009. I decided to take up Thawte on their offer of a free one-year VeriSign Email Certificate (Digital ID Class 1). Here are some things I learned — the hard way about using a VeriSign Digital ID Class 1 on the Mac environment.

I followed the instructions on the e-mail from Thawte and downloaded my certificate from Verisign using Safari. It got loaded to my keychain and I thought I life was good. The Mail application could not find the new certificate associated with the my e-mail address.

Here is what I found out: Modern browsers have crypto tools which generate public/private key-pairs. When signing up for a certificate with an authority (as with VeriSign), their website should trigger your browser to create a key-pair and then upload the public key, which is then certified and returned to you. This certificate is in a file format called .p12.

Using Safari, the certificate I got from VeriSign was a .p7c file, which has no copy of your private key.

The only way I was able to get a proper .p12 file was using Firefox on my Mac to access the VeriSign certificate tools to renew my certificate (which essentially revokes the old one and generates a new one).

Once the certificate was installed in Firefox, I exported it to a .p12 file which I then imported into my keychain after deleting the useless certificate that had been previously imported.

Problem solved.

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